Why is Gandhi Jayanti celebrated? Know what is its importance

Gandhi Jayanti 2021: Mahatma Gandhi is also addressed as Father of the Nation and Bapu. Gandhiji fought throughout his life against the British for the independence of India.

‘Gandhi Jayanti’ is celebrated every year on 2 October. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, who played an important role in the independence of the country and taught the lesson of non-violence to the people, was born on 2 October 1869 in Porbandar, Gujarat. This year the 152nd birth anniversary of Gandhiji is being celebrated. Keeping in view the importance of this day, a national holiday is kept all over the country.

Prayer meetings and cultural programs are organized in schools, colleges and government institutions on the day of Gandhi Jayanti. At the same time, the leaders of the country pay homage to Mahatma Gandhi’s Samadhi at Raj Ghat. The birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi is celebrated with great pomp not only in India but in many countries of the world.

Why is Gandhi Jayanti celebrated? Mahatma Gandhi is also addressed as Father of the Nation and Bapu. Gandhiji fought throughout his life against the British for the independence of India. Gandhiji believed that non-violence is a philosophy, a principle and an experience, on the basis of which it is possible to build a better society. Gandhiji He was peace-loving and had always described non-violence as the first religion. Gandhiji successfully led the non-violent movement against the British. Gandhiji’s principles were adopted by the whole world, his life is no less than an inspiration for the people.

Movement was waged in South Africa: Dada Abdullah had offered Gandhi to practice law in South Africa. After which he went to South Africa in 1893 on a one-year contract. However, there the discrimination against Indians shook Gandhiji to the core. After this, Gandhi started non-violent protests in South Africa in 1894 against racial discrimination against Africans and Indians, in this movement thousands of people joined him and opposed the government.

Dandi March and Quit India Movement: After returning from South Africa Gandhiji started a demonstration against the British. In 1930 he led the Dandi March and in 1942 the ‘Quit India Movement’. Both these movements took a nationwide form. The British were also surprised to see this non-violent demonstration of Gandhiji.

In view of Gandhi’s contribution to India’s independence and contribution against racial discrimination in South Africa, the United Nations decided to celebrate 15 June 2007 as ‘International Day of Non-Violence’.

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